Pet Passports

Order today: call us 020 7515 2505

At our clinic we issue Pet passports for dogs, cats and ferrets, health certificates are available also.

Please be aware that you might require pet passport and additional documents for your dog, cat or ferret if you are traveling from / to UK.

We always strongly advice, that you check with authorities (customs, border control, embassy and etc.), airlines, travel providers which documents you might require. Each country or travel provider might have different rules and regulations. Travel providers might request special travel cages or refuse to transport certain breads.

You can enter or return to the UK with your pet cat, dog or ferret if it:

Your pet may be put into quarantine for up to 4 months if you don’t follow these rules – or refused entry if you travelled by sea. You’re responsible for any fees or charges.

You must follow extra rules if the animals will be:

Before you travel

Check if the company you’re travelling with:

Travelling with your pet

Your pet must arrive in the UK no more than 5 days before or after you, or you’ll have to follow different rules.

You must use an approved transport company and route unless you’re travelling between the UK and Ireland.

You need to fill in a declaration confirming that you aren’t going to sell or transfer the ownership of your pet.

Authorising someone else to travel with your pet

Your pet can travel with someone else if you’ve authorised it in writing.

Bringing other animals

The rules are different if you’re bringing other animals into the UK.

Please check for more information: https://www.gov.uk/take-pet-abroad/overview

This information provided by www.gov.uk 30.01.2017

Where you’re travelling from

The rules for bringing your pet cat, dog or ferret into the UK depend on whether you’re coming from:

Countries the UK accepts pet passports from

As well as all countries in the EU, the UK also accepts pet passports from:

Andorra
Azores and Madeira
Canary Islands
French Guiana
Gibraltar
Greenland and the Faroe Islands
Guadeloupe
Iceland
Liechtenstein
Martinique
Monaco
Norway
Reunion
San Marino
Switzerland
Vatican City
Listed countries

The listed countries are:

Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Aruba, Ascension Island, Australia, Bahrain, Barbados, Belarus, Bermuda, BES Islands (Bonair, Saint Eustatius and Saba), Bosnia-Herzegovina, British Virgin Islands, Canada, Cayman Islands, Chile, Curaçao, Falkland Islands, Fiji, French Polynesia, Hong Kong, Japan, Malaysia, Mauritius, Mexico, Montserrat, New Caledonia, New Zealand, Russian Federation, Saint Maarten, Singapore, St Helena, St Kitts and Nevis, St Lucia, St Pierre and Miquelon, St Vincent and The Grenadines, Taiwan, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Trinidad and Tobago, United Arab Emirates, USA (includes American Samoa, Guam, Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico and the US virgin Islands), Vanuatu, Wallis and Futuna.

If you’re travelling from Jamaica, you must have your pet microchipped and vaccinated in a different non-EU listed country or put your pet into quarantine.

There are more rules if you’re entering the UK with a cat from Australia or a cat or dog from Malaysia.

pet passport

Pet passport and other documents

You need a pet passport for your dog, cat or ferret if they’ll be travelling:

to the UK from an EU country, or another country the UK accepts pet passports from
from the UK to a listed or unlisted country and then returning to the UK – you can’t do this after your pet’s rabies vaccination has expired
There has been no change to the rights and status of EU nationals in the UK, and UK nationals in the EU, as a result of the referendum.

If they’re coming from a listed or unlisted country, you need a third-country official veterinary certificate if they don’t have a pet passport.

You must bring originals of all your pet’s documents, not photocopies.

Getting a pet passport
Pet passports list the different treatments your pet has had.

You can get one from certain vets in EU countries, and other countries the UK accepts pet passports from. If your vet doesn’t issue pet passports, ask them for the nearest that does, or contact the Animal and Plant Health Agency.

You’ll need to take your pet, its identity and vaccination records and any rabies blood test results (if you have them) when you get a pet passport.

The passport is only valid if you meet the entry requirements. You don’t need to get a new style passport (issued from 29 December 2014) until all the treatment spaces are full.

You should travel with previous pet passports in some cases, for example if your pet has had a blood test. Ask your vet if you think this applies to your pet.

Only vets in countries that the UK accepts pet passports from can enter information into the pet passport (except for tapeworm treatments).

Before you travel

Check that the vet has filled in the following sections in the pet passport:

Third-country official veterinary certificate

To enter or return to the EU from listed or unlisted countries you need either:

When you can use a certificate

Your pet must arrive in an EU country within 10 days of the certificate being issued. It’s valid for 4 months for further travel within the EU.

You should get the person who checks your pet when you arrive in the EU to sign and stamp the certificate.

When you can use a pet passport

You don’t need a third-country official veterinary certificate if your pet was issued with a pet passport before leaving the EU and the treatments are still valid. Any booster vaccinations or blood tests carried out from outside the EU must be recorded on a third-country official veterinary certificate.

Exchanging the certificate for a pet passport

You can exchange the certificate for an EU pet passport if:

You’ll have to show the vet:

Cats from Australia

To bring a cat into the UK from Australia, you must have a certificate from the Australian Department of Agriculture confirming your cat hasn’t been exposed to the Hendra virus in the 60 days before you left.

Dogs and cats from Peninsular Malaysia

You must have a certificate from the Malaysian government veterinary health services to bring your dog or cat into the UK from Peninsular Malaysia. The certificate must show your pet:

hasn’t had contact with pigs in the 60 days before you left
hasn’t been on a holding where Nipah disease has been found in the 60 days before you left
has a negative blood test result for Nipah virus antibody – the test must be carried out by a laboratory approved for Nipah virus on a blood sample taken no more than 10 days before you leave

Microchip

Your pet must be microchipped before they get a rabies vaccination or they’ll need to be vaccinated again.

Microchipping for pet travel can only be done by:

Reading the microchip

Airlines and train and ferry companies in the EU can read microchips that meet International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standards ISO 11784 and ISO 11785 when you check in for your journey.

You may have to bring your own microchip reader when you travel if your pet’s microchip doesn’t meet ISO standards. You should check with your travel company before you leave.

Your pet could be refused entry or put into quarantine if its microchip can’t be read when you enter or return to the UK.

If the microchip can’t be read

You’ll have to do all the preparation again if your vet can’t read the microchip. This means you’ll have to ask your vet to:

If the microchip can only sometimes be read

Your vet should try to read the microchip – if they get a reading they can then re-chip your pet (the original chip isn’t removed).

This must be recorded in the current pet passport or a new passport with:

Your vet should record in the ‘Others’ section of the pet passport that your pet has been re-chipped.

Pet passports issued from 29 December 2014

You must get a new pet passport if your pet is re-chipped because its microchip can’t always be read.

The vet needs to:

Tattoo

You don’t need to have your pet microchipped if it’s been tattooed with an identification number and all of the following are true:

Rabies vaccination, boosters and blood tests

You must get your dog, cat or ferret vaccinated against rabies before it can travel. Your vet needs proof that your pet’s at least 12 weeks old before vaccinating them.

Your pet must be microchipped before their vaccination or they’ll need to be vaccinated again.

The vaccine must be an inactivated vaccine or recombinant vaccine that’s approved in the country of use.

Countries the UK accepts pet passports from and listed countries
You must wait 21 days after the vaccination (or the last of the primary course of vaccinations) before bringing your pet to the UK from:

Unlisted countries

You must follow certain rules after having your pet vaccinated if you’re travelling to the UK from an unlisted country:

  1. Your pet must have a blood sample taken at least 30 days after the rabies vaccination.
  2. Your vet must send the blood sample to an EU-approved blood testing laboratory from either inside the EU or outside the EU.
  3. The results of the blood test must show that the vaccination was successful (rabies antibody level of at least 0.5 IU/ml).
  4. You must wait 3 months from the date the blood sample was taken before you travel – you don’t need to wait if your pet was vaccinated, blood tested and given a pet passport in the EU before travelling to an unlisted country.
  5. The vet must give you a copy of the test results and enter the day the blood sample was taken in a third-country official veterinary certificate.

The blood test will continue to be valid as long as your pet’s rabies vaccinations are kept up to date.

Booster vaccinations

You must get regular booster vaccinations for your pet. Check your pet passport or third-country official veterinary certificate to find out when the booster vaccination is due.

Get a third-country official veterinary certificate if your pet needs a booster vaccination while you’re outside the EU.

If you miss the booster and you’re travelling from an unlisted country, your pet will need to be vaccinated and blood tested again and you’ll have to wait for 3 months before travelling.

Vaccination record

Your pet’s vaccination record in their passport or third-country official veterinary certificate must show:

Your pet can be stopped from travelling if the details in their pet passport are in the wrong place.

Pet passports issued from 29 December 2014

The vet only needs to fill in the ‘valid from’ date for the first vaccination (or re-vaccination if you missed a booster).

If the rabies vaccination record is a sticker, it must be covered by a laminated strip (included with the pet passport).

Tapeworm treatment for dogs

A vet must treat your dog for tapeworm and record it in the pet passport or third-country official veterinary certificate every time you want to bring it to the UK.

The treatment must have been given no less than 24 hours and no more than 120 hours (5 days) before you enter the UK. Your dog can be refused entry or put into quarantine if you don’t follow this rule.

You don’t need to treat your dog for tapeworm if you’re coming directly to the UK from Finland, Ireland, Malta or Norway.

The treatment must:

Short trips

If you’re leaving the UK for a short trip, your dog must be treated by a vet before you go. You must wait for 24 hours before re-entering the UK and return within 120 hours or you’ll need to get another treatment abroad.

You should treat your dog again within 28 days of returning to the UK.

Information your vet needs to record

Check the vet has put the following details in the ‘Echinococcus treatment’ section of your dog’s pet passport or certificate:

Guide and assistance dogs

People with assistance dogs can travel:

Guide and assistance dogs must also meet the normal rules for travelling with dogs.

Eligibility

UK travel companies usually recognise guide or assistance dogs trained by organisations that are members of either:

Assistance Dogs International
International Guide Dog Federation
You should check with your travel company if the organisation that trained your dog isn’t a member of either association.

The Guide Dogs Association website has advice about taking assistance dogs abroad.

Travelling by air

Your airline must allow you to travel with your assistance dog if your flight departs from inside the EU.

You must bring a car harness with you when you travel by air, so that your dog can be secured when the plane takes off and lands.

You can enter any UK airport with your assistance dog.

There may be additional rules to follow if your flight departs from outside the EU. Check with your airline before you travel.

Travelling by sea
You must be allowed to travel with your assistance dog on:

ferry services entering and leaving the EU
cruise services which leave from any EU country and arrive in England, Scotland or Wales
Check with the ferry or cruise company if your journey is different to this.

Travelling by rail

Rail operators travelling within the EU must accept assistance dogs, but operators may have extra conditions.

Check with the rail operator before you travel inside or outside the EU.

Approved routes

You can only use certain travel routes and companies to enter England, Scotland or Wales.

Check the routes before you travel – they can change or may only operate at certain times of the year.

Pets usually travel as cargo, but there are different rules if you’re arriving by air or sea with an assistance dog.

Travelling to and from Northern Ireland and Ireland

Contact the DAERA if you’re travelling to Northern Ireland.

You don’t have to use an approved transport company if you’re travelling from Ireland to the UK.

You can only bring a pet into the UK on a private boat or plane if you’re travelling from Ireland.

Bringing more than 5 pets

You can’t bring more than 5 pets to the UK unless you’re attending or training for a competition, show, sporting event. You’ll need written evidence of registration for the event when you travel.

All your pets must:

You’ll have to follow the commercial rules for importing animals if you want to travel with more than 5 pets that aren’t attending or training for a competition, show or sporting event.

Arriving in the UK

When you arrive in the UK, staff from the travel company or airport will scan your pet’s microchip and check your documents. Your pet might be checked before you board, for example if you’re travelling by sea or Eurotunnel.

Your pet could be put into quarantine or sent back to the country it travelled from if:

Entering the UK from outside the EU

You can only collect your pet after it’s been taken through customs. You can usually pay an agent, travel company or airline to do this for you.

If you can’t get someone to do this for you, you should either:

contact customs where you’re arriving before you travel
ask the National Clearance Hub at nch@hmrc.gsi.gov.uk for more information

Complaints and help

Please contact Poplar Vets on 020 7515 2505 if you want to order Pet Passport or travel certificate.

Contact the Pet Travel Scheme helpline if you need more information about pet travel.

Pet Travel Scheme helpline pettravel@apha.gsi.gov.uk
Telephone: 0370 241 1710
Monday to Friday, 8am to 6pm (closed on bank holidays)
Find out about call charges

Complaints
You’ll need to have the following information to make a complaint:

your name and contact details
date your pet was checked by a vet
date and time of travel
name of the pet owner
species of pet
carrier and route
ticket number or airway bill (AWB) for pets travelling by plane
details of the complaint you want to make
details of any contact with the Animal and Plant Health Agency you had before the time of your complaint
Animal and Plant Health Agency pettravel@apha.gsi.gov.uk
Telephone: 0370 241 1710
Monday to Friday, 8am to 6pm
Find out about call charges

Pet Travel Section
Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA)
Centre for International Trade
Eden Bridge House
Lowther Street
Carlisle
CA3 8DX

Report an illegally imported pet

Contact your local Trading Standards Office if you think that an animal has been imported illegally.

In London contact the City of London Animal Health and Welfare Team.

City of London Animal Health and Welfare Team
Telephone: 020 8745 7894
Find out about call charges